Item #11849 Two items from a Mexican occult group called the World’s Unique Assembly Quetzalcoatl, Royal Order of the Plumed Serpent and Supreme Priesthood of the Messenger of the Fifth Sun. Rosa Maria Campos, Jose Antonio Bautista.

Two items from a Mexican occult group called the World’s Unique Assembly Quetzalcoatl, Royal Order of the Plumed Serpent and Supreme Priesthood of the Messenger of the Fifth Sun

1966. Two extremely scarce items from an obscure Mexican occult group called the Asamblea Unica Mundial (A.U.M.) Quetzalcoatl, Real Orden de la Serpiente Emplumada y S. S. M. del Quinto Sol (translated on the group’s literature as, World’s Unique Assembly Quetzalcoatl, Royal Order of the Plumed Serpent and Supreme Priesthood of the Messenger of the Fifth Sun). The group was led by an occultist and cosmologist named Jose Antonio Bautista Orozco who claimed to be the heir of the secrets of the Aztec deity Quetzalcoatl.

The bulk of what we know about Bautista and the A.U.M. comes from two items offered here, a circular that reprints a profile of him published in the newspaper Ovaciones by a young journalist named Rosa Maria Campos (later a PRI politician) and a presumably one-off publication simply titled “Peace!” The newspaper profile titled, “The Messenger of Ketzalkoatl [sic] Speaks,” recounts Bautista’s alleged death and miraculous resurrection following a 1951 assault in which he was thrown into a deep ravine. He was then apparently restored to life on the coroner’s table, which Bautista attributed to his practice of Nahoas Philosophy, in which he possessed complete dominion over his body. The article concludes with Bautista’s opinion on the Hatha yoga of the Aztecs vs. the “selfish” yoga of the Hindus.

The Peace! publication provides further insight into the A.U.M.’s religious and philosophical underpinnings, including the influence of theosophy and yoga (a subscription form for the group’s journal, Yoga, appears at the bottom of the rear page). We also presume Bautista was influenced by the French occultist and philosopher, Serge Raynaud de la Ferriere, who founded the Universal Great Brotherhood in 1948 in Caracas, Venezuela. The only reference to Bautista that we could find was in Ferriere’s published letters, in which Bautista is referred to as Ferrier’s Jefe del Servicio de Brigadas Misionales in Mexico. We could find no reference to the A.U.M., except for a listing in the Global Civil Society Database, so we presume the group did not last long.

Both items are published in English perhaps indicating Bautista’s interest in attracting a wider audience. The circular is one-sided and printed in black on white stock (13” x 7”) and includes a photograph of Bautista and an illustration of Quetzalcoatl. The Peace! publication is printed in blue on both sides of a newsprint sheet (11” x 8 ½”). Item #11849

Price: $500.00